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Norfolk Travel Tips

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Bacton

Walcott Beach in Norfolk. Halfway between the kiss-me-quick front in Great Yarmouth and the Chelsea-on-Sea atmosphere of North Norfolk is the hidden gem of Walcott. It is a tiny place, though next door is the North Sea gas terminal at Bacton. Walcott has a wonderful beach that rarely has more than a handful of people on it. It is a great beach for strolling on, head down and looking for sea glass and the occasional sea anemone fossil – when you do find one of these it is a real bonus, they are made of hard stone, and somehow have kept the markings, so the fossil is almost black grey, and the markings very white. The sands are clean, and there are lots of pebbles for contrast and treasure hunting. It is worth lifting the head from the beach, however, as there is a good chance of spotting a curious seal watching you watch it. They are feeding on the abundant fish off Walcott, which is a very healthy stretch of shore – if you are really lucky you may come across the occasional small fish driven onto the sand by the seals or the predators like mackerel that panic them. Back above the sea defences there are all the necessities for a good day at the seaside. The chippie is brilliant, with more than just the usual cod on offer, and picnic benches outside so you can enjoy the ‘catch’ in the sea air. There is a small general store with beach goods – we got a stunt-kite that for once worked, and kept a ten-year-old happy for hours. And at either end of the village there is a pub, though the one to the south is a fair distance away. Just getting to Walcott is a pleasure. The quick way is taking the A149 and then cutting across country. The slow way is dawdling through the rolling country on the back roads, taking in the villages nearby – Happisburgh (pronounced Haysbro’) falling into the sea to the south, or historic Paston to the north.

Bacton Town Details

Downham Market

The Crown is the very best place to eat, the Coaching Inn was built in 1700, pass through the big black gates and glance right, you will see the step used to mount horses. Either eat in the bar, or the Stables restaurant which as the name suggests used to be the stables when it was a coaching Inn, the food is seriously good value and in a really pretty pub, in the summer sit outside in the old courtyard where the stunning colourful hanging baskets please the eye. Parking in the town by the way is free! - Sharon

Denver - Norfolk
For a really pretty pub and delightful walk along a canal path the Jenyns Arms at Denver Sluice really is worthwhile, drive along sluice road and go further than you think you should across the sluice gates and you will see the small car park of the Jenyns Arms, to your right there is the canal path or straight ahead is the pub, once your drinks are chosen move outside and the really pretty garden sits on the edge of the water, the ducks and swans glide by and it’s beautiful. A couple of minutes away is a working flour Mill and a couple of craft shops, one definitely worth calling into is the leather shop where everything is hand tooled, you can see the items being made.. fascinating.

Downham Market Town Details

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth Market...Great Yarmouth in Norfolk got its first charter in 1209 from King John. The market place is surrounded by ancient buildings as well as less favoured modern ones – the 1702 Fishermen’s Hospital and the huge Parish Church of St Nicholas, patron saint of fishermen, founded in 1101. And in the market you will find the best cockles and whelks that money can buy, served in little containers ready for drenching in vinegar and a sprinkle of salt. Even picky kids will be tempted to try some.

Walcott Beach in Norfolk. Halfway between the kiss-me-quick front in Great Yarmouth and the Chelsea-on-Sea atmosphere of North Norfolk is the hidden gem of Walcott. It is a tiny place, though next door is the North Sea gas terminal at Bacton. Walcott has a wonderful beach that rarely has more than a handful of people on it. It is a great beach for strolling on, head down and looking for sea glass and the occasional sea anemone fossil – when you do find one of these it is a real bonus, they are made of hard stone, and somehow have kept the markings, so the fossil is almost black grey, and the markings very white. The sands are clean, and there are lots of pebbles for contrast and treasure hunting. It is worth lifting the head from the beach, however, as there is a good chance of spotting a curious seal watching you watch it. They are feeding on the abundant fish off Walcott, which is a very healthy stretch of shore – if you are really lucky you may come across the occasional small fish driven onto the sand by the seals or the predators like mackerel that panic them. Back above the sea defences there are all the necessities for a good day at the seaside. The chippie is brilliant, with more than just the usual cod on offer, and picnic benches outside so you can enjoy the ‘catch’ in the sea air. There is a small general store with beach goods – we got a stunt-kite that for once worked, and kept a ten-year-old happy for hours. And at either end of the village there is a pub, though the one to the south is a fair distance away. Just getting to Walcott is a pleasure. The quick way is taking the A149 and then cutting across country. The slow way is dawdling through the rolling country on the back roads, taking in the villages nearby – Happisburgh (pronounced Haysbro’) falling into the sea to the south, or historic Paston to the north.

Great Yarmouth Town Details

Hunstanton

The seaside resort of Hunstanton enjoys a unique position - it is the only west-facing resort on the east coast, giving the chance for visitors to enjoy some truly spectacular sunsets.
As well as the clean, safe, sandy beach and unusual striped cliffs, attractions include the Princess Theatre, the Hunstanton Sea Life Sanctury, Adventure Golf, amusements, the funfair and the colourful Oasis Leisure Centre - a real seaside holiday with all the trimmings - Ernie

Heacham - Norfolk
Caley Mill is home to a lovely Lavender Farm, apart from a herb garden and lots of different varieties of lavender plants on sale, there are interesting gift shops selling the usual lavender soaps but more interestingly lavender beer and shortbread, cross over the little bridge and take a stroll around the fragrant meadow, or you can even take a guided tour at certain times to see how the lavender is processed the aroma is unforgettable. In the café a must try item is their delicious lavender scone…..Sharon

A walk along the promenade unveils the usual seaside shops, however the sunsets really are spectacular so hopefully the flip flop shop will be closed and not interfere with the magic as the sun disappears into the sea - Elias

Hunstanton Town Details

Kings Lynn

The Caithness Crystal visitor centre is free to get in and the glass making demonstrations are terrific - Sharon

Sandringham - Apart from the Royal residence and the Museum which is very interesting, at the back of the shop walk outside as there is a delightful array of plants grown on the estate that are for sale and the prices are reasonable……Sharon

King's Lynn is steeped in maritime history with an impressive range of visitor attractions - Lynn Museum, True's Yard and the Town House Museum - telling of the town's intriguing past. The beautifully restored Custom House houses the Tourist Information Centre and maritime display, and the Green Quay Discovery Centre is close by along the restored quayside. In July the King's Lynn Arts Festival and the town's free 'Festival Too' offer a variety of performances - Tony

Kings Lynn Town Details

Norwich

The Market held in Norwich is terrific, the brightly coloured canopies all lined up is a spectacle not to be missed, you can buy anything from second hand books and music to cheese…… the market is open from Monday to Saturday every week, Saturday does get busy so if you can go on a different day it’s better - Sharon

If you are travelling in East Norfolk and want to avoid the traffic in Yarmouth or Norwich when you cross the Yare, don’t forget there is a little car-ferry at Reedham. It’s quaint, regular, and reasonably pricede, and somehow turns a trip into a bit of travel. Reedham is a pretty village with some great pubs on the riverfront if you want to stop for a bit of refreshment on the way - Martin

Norwich Town Details

Sheringham

Sheringham is a lovely market town with a beautiful beach, lots to do, great shopping, a brilliant little theatre and plenty of places to eat at. There is always a good atmosphere all year round with weekenders and holidaymakers livening up the place! The market every Saturday and Wednesday (March-October) is well worth a visit. - Sally

Sheringham Town Details

Swaffham

A beautiful market town with a newly refurbished market place. Excellent FREE parking in the town centre with superb facilities. The cleanliness and lack of litter was particularly noticeable. Visiting the Market Cross 17th Century inn is a must - Roger Goodchild

Swaffham Town Details

Norfolk County Page | Norfolk Attractions| More Tips

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